High-intensity interval training (or HIIT) boosts your metabolism, burns calories, and builds muscle: a triple threat belly fat cannot reckon with. “High-intensity interval training is when you perform an exercise at or close to your maximum ability for a short period of time and then take a brief respite and do it again. HIIT should usually be done on a 2:1 interval, meaning if you did an exercise for one minute, you rest for 30 seconds and then repeat,” explains Dr. Alex Tauberg, DC, CSCS, EMR. “This can be a great way to flatten that stomach when you don’t have too much time to work out.”
As with most other training goals the fat loss craze has reached epic proportions to where special diets - the more bizarre sounding the more popular they seem - and insane cardio regimes are the norm. With cardio we today see the devoted masses scheduling in one hour - or more- sessions each day of the week and wondering why they are not losing body fat (with all the muscle often lost through such an enterprise it is really no surprise). Further, there are those with even greater discipline who train as if they are preparing for inclusion in an elite military unit, with hour upon hour of endurance work heaped upon exhaustive weight training sessions and supported by starvation diets.
In fact, a study in BMC Endocrine Disorders found that just 12 15-minute HIIT sessions improved the insulin sensitivity of overweight participants by 23 percent. What does this meal for fat loss? Making sure your insulin sensitivity is in check can increase your ability to break down fat and can lower your risk of diabetes, cancer, and metabolism-affecting thyroid issues.
Still with us? Let’s move onto absorption. The absorption of fats happen in our small intestine, but as mentioned above, triglycerides can’t be absorbed in our intestine unless they are broken down, absorbed into the intestine walls, then transported to our lymphatic system first and eventually into our bloodstream, where they’ll reach adipose, cardiac, and muscle tissue.
While it is technically correct that cardio activity will use fat to fuel energy output, this process usually only lasts as long as the session itself, and because we gradually adjust to certain levels of intensity the body increasingly resists shedding unwanted weight when routinely using this method: this is why varying one's cardio intensity levels is mandatory if we wish to optimize fat loss. Weight training, however, will work one's body much more intensely than most forms of cardio will, thus stimulating a greater metabolic response, which will ultimately lead to increased fat loss above and beyond that directly attributable to aerobic work.
Add resistance training. A 2006 study published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism suggests that combining cardiovascular (aerobic) exercise with resistance training is more effective than cardiovascular training alone in getting rid of abdominal fat.[11] You can do resistance training with free weights, exercise machines or resistance bands and it may also be useful to train from unstable positions due to increased muscle activity.
Ultimately, you need to pick a healthy eating plan you can stick to, Stewart says. The benefit of a low-carb approach is that it simply involves learning better food choices—no calorie-counting is necessary. In general, a low-carb way of eating shifts your intake away from problem foods—those high in carbs and sugar and without much fiber, like bread, bagels and sodas—and toward high-fiber or high-protein choices, like vegetables, beans and healthy meats.

"Only doing abdominal-focused workouts, like crunches, won’t help you banish the bulge. Belly fat is simply where your body stores energy, so you need to take a whole-body approach to tackle it. HIIT training (high intensity interval training) is a great way to burn fat and get your heart rate up. Squats, burpees and treadmill sprints are all examples to try." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXyOlGTT9QE
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