Carefully consider fad diets. Let's tell it like it is: if you spend the next 10 days drinking nothing but lemonade and Sriracha, you're going to lose a ton of weight. You'll just feel like crap a week from now and all the weight will come back when you reintroduce food to your body. It totally messes up your metabolism and if you're looking for a long-term solution, this isn't it. But if you're looking to fit into that dress? Well...maybe. Just be careful. And don't tell your mom we mentioned it.
The notion that abdominal obesity is the most dangerous kind isn't new. Back in the 1940s, the French physician Jean Vague observed that some obese patients had normal blood chemistry, while some moderately overweight patients showed serious abnormalities that predisposed them to heart disease or diabetes. Almost always, the latter patients carried their fat around their middles. And, almost always, they were men.
When researchers at the University of Tennessee put a group of volunteers on one of two diets—one high in calcium and one not—and cut each group’s calorie intake by 500 calories, they found that the people getting calcium lost twice as much weight (an average of 13lbs) compared with people on the standard diet. Study author Michael Zemel, Ph.D., believes extra calcium helps the body burn more—and store less—fat.

I know easier said than done, but it is a key factor of the fat loss equation. Stress will ruin your insulin sensitivity causing the body to over secrete the fat storage hormone insulin. Furthermore high cortisol levels elevated due to stress also activate fat storage receptors, for men in the mid section and women have a harder time with the hips/buttocks area. We are well equipped to deal with short term stress such as being chased by a wild animal, but the long term stressors from over due bills, relationship issues, sick relatives etc are what really take a toll. Signs that you are overstressed include excessive body fat levels, consistent fatigue, irritability and lack of motivation. Overtraining syndrome has similar symptoms as high stress levels are one of the key factors involved with reducing your capacity to recover from training.
Most of us eat quickly, chewing each bite just a few times, which means we consume more food than we realize. Slow down and you'll slim down: In a recent study, people who chewed each bite 40 times ate almost 12 percent less than those who chewed just 15 times. When we chew longer, our bodies produce less ghrelin, a hormone that boosts appetite, and more of the peptide hormones that are believed to curb hunger. "Chewing seems to stimulate the gut to make appetite-suppressing peptide hormones," Dr. Cypess explains. Plus, the more you chew, the more thoroughly you break down food, which may release nutrients into your blood faster and give your brain time to register that you're full. From now on, focus on eating slowly at every meal. Put down your fork between bites and work your way up to 40 chews per mouthful of food.
Most people think they will lose weight by doing an hour-long session in the gym, but if they’re sedentary for the other 23 hours in the day, their calorie expenditure will be relatively low. How active you are can play a huge part in whether you lose weight or not. One of the greatest ways how to lose weight – one that hardly anyone is aware of – is ‘non-exercise activity thermogenesis’ (NEAT). This is the energy you expend doing day-to-day activities like shopping, cleaning, walking, and even fidgeting.

That sour cherry is pretty sweet when it comes to your health. The results of a study conducted at the University of Michigan found that rats given high-fat foods along with tart cherries ditched nine percent more body fat than those in a control group over just 12 weeks. Cherries are also a good source of antioxidant pigment resveratrol, which has been linked to reductions in belly fat, dementia risk, and lower rates of macular degeneration among the elderly.


"Only doing abdominal-focused workouts, like crunches, won’t help you banish the bulge. Belly fat is simply where your body stores energy, so you need to take a whole-body approach to tackle it. HIIT training (high intensity interval training) is a great way to burn fat and get your heart rate up. Squats, burpees and treadmill sprints are all examples to try." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXyOlGTT9QE
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