To lose fat and keep it off requires an approach that is both effective and easy to maintain. For most, a wide variety of foods in the right quantities and at the right times is best. If we eat too much - the standard "three square meals" a day - we run the risk of putting on weight due to the sluggish metabolism this encourages combined with the surplus of calories that will require burning at any one time. Eat too little and we again encourage a slow metabolic rate due to muscle loss while discouraging the thermogenic effect (when foods themselves increase the metabolism) that foods, in sufficient quantities, will create.
The popular Atkins Diet, for example, encourages one to load up on fatty foods at the expanse of carbohydrates, the theory being that the body will become programmed to burn fat as opposed to carbohydrates for energy, which will ultimately lead to a leaner physique. However, the lack of nutrients this diet offers, and that would be included when consuming a wide variety of food sources may, over time, lead to nutritional imbalances and poor health. Due to its limited food choices this diet is also boring for many people. Overall it appears that fad diets - so called become they usually fall out of favor quickly or become popular, depending on one's subjective view - are used to reach a specific target (such is the case, for example, with the "three day diet"): perhaps a new dress is to be worn for a special occasion and one only has a few weeks to lose enough weight to fit it.
3. Be realistic about which habits need to go. "When I was heavy, I'd eat French fries every single day, plus carbs at almost every meal—like a sandwich for lunch or bread with pasta for dinner. A diet so heavy in fried food and carbs just isn't conducive to weight loss. To lose the weight, I went from three large meals a day to six small meals, mostly made of fresh vegetable salads with lean meats and nuts. And no more bread!"
1. Barley For Breakfast – Swedish researchers found that eating barley or rye kernels for the first meal of the day lead to more stable blood sugar levels. Both are considered to below on the glycemic index, raising your blood sugar very slowly. This will help stabilize your blood sugar and help you avoid peaks and valleys that can leave you feeling famished.
That’s because it theoretically causes a mild ketosis (yep, the basis of the keto diet), which is a fat-burning state that should make you feel less hungry. The key in being successful with a low-carb diet (especially if you’re used to a more high-carb lifestyle) is to compensate for those lost carbs with protein-rich foods, says Dr. Cheskin. That way, your volume of food stays the same, but you’re doing it healthfully rather than in a way that exacerbates your weight gain.

There’s a reason everyone harps on about protein: Not only does it help keep you full, but it’s also responsible for repairing the tiny tears caused by strength training in your muscles. This helps them grow bigger and stronger, nudging out body fat in the process. As a general rule of thumb, aim to get at least 70 grams of protein throughout the day, says Dr. Cheskin. (These high-protein foods can help you reach that goal.)
However, due to the intense exercise, the total calorie consumption is higher. We burn more calories due to the hard muscle work – even AFTER the run. The body needs more energy for recovery, thereby burning even more calories. That’s how you benefit from post-workout fat burning and the afterburn effect (EPOC, excess post-exercise oxygen consumption). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CN-1CUm3J8

A daily run or Spin class is great for your heart, but cardio workouts alone won't do much for your waist. "You need to do a combination of weights and cardiovascular training," says Sangeeta Kashyap, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Strength training increases muscle mass, which sets your body up to burn more fat. "Muscle burns more calories than fat, and therefore you naturally burn more calories throughout the day by having more muscle," says Kate Patton, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. Patton recommends 250 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise or 125 minutes of high-intensity exercise a week.
From this moment forward, say “HALT” before you eat. Barke suggests you use this technique to determine if the need for food is physical or psychological. H refers to genuine hunger or habit. “If you’re physically hungry, then you need to eat,” she says. “But often we don’t eat because of hunger, but out of habit.” The remaining letters refer to other wrong reasons for eating: A because you’re anxious; L because you’re lonely or depressed; and T because you’re tired.
But in today's unenlightened "believe everything you hear" age this most effective and proven approach, for some strange reason, does not seem to attract much interest. This is no more obvious when one witnesses the "technological" revolution that is happening within the fitness industry, where a newer even more ridiculous gadget compared to the one that preceded it promises to build you the body of your dreams, with little effort on your part, "in 30 days or your money back"; where a machine that does most of the work for you is touted as a suitable replacement for actually applying a modicum of effort. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDHGaU_jGrQ
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