“Under normal conditions, humans absorb only about 80% of the nutrients from the food they eat,” says A. Roberto Frisancho, Ph.D., a weight-loss researcher at the University of Michigan. But, he says, when the body is deprived of nourishment, it becomes a super-efficient machine, pulling what nutrients it can from whatever food is consumed. Start eating again normally and your body may not catch up; instead it will continue to store food as fat.

Cut carbohydrates. To lose weight quickly, you should eliminate the sugars found in most carbohydrates. Simple, or bad, carbohydrates include foods like bread, pasta, and potatoes. All carbohydrates break down into glucose which provides your body with energy. In a weight loss study, people who cut out carbohydrates were more likely to lose weight than going on a low-fat diet.[1]

For overall health improvements - the mental boost it provides and enhanced blood circulation etc - aerobic exercise should be included in any good fitness program, and indeed it does burn body fat and can assist weight training throughout this process. But to overemphasize it while neglecting high intensity weight training is a fundamental mistake. In fact, excessive cardio may negate our weight training efforts; it can rob us of our strength and negatively impact our recovery abilities. Yet, used correctly as a tool rather than blindly using it as foundational to the achievement of our fitness goals, it can improve recovery and enhance muscle growth: three 45 minute sessions per week would be sufficient, slightly more or less depending on the host of individual factors (metabolic response, body type and so on) that often make designing specific training programs difficult.
Eat smaller, more frequent meals. Eating smaller, healthier meals, more frequently will make you feel better and give you more energy. It will also stop you from feeling hungry which will eliminate your temptation to eat more. [14]There are a number of diets out there you can try, but you should always try and hit your calorie limit each day. Consider a diet similar to this one:
Take weight loss. So caught up in marketing hype have we become that the simplest and most effective fat loss strategies are often passed over as being "outdated" and not "cutting edge" enough to warrant inclusion in one's program. Those who chose to train "old school" are increasingly labeled dinosaurs and confined to a forgotten age where protein shakes tasted like sawdust and, would you believe, bench presses and squats formed the basis of a person's training program.
It is best to achieve one's dietary requirements somewhere in the middle and, once again, bodybuilders have led the way in this regard. To gain muscle and lose fat requires a steady stream of nutrients to feed our cells and fuel our workouts. Bodybuilders - dating back to the 40s and 50s - have noted that when consuming four to five (sometimes up to seven) smaller meals per day they are better able to remain lean and muscular.

Hitting big compound movements like the squats, deadlifts and pull-ups ahead of isolation exercises like bicep curls and leg extensions is the best bang-for-your-buck way to recruit the most muscle mass and burn more calories. If you are trying to lose fat, you need to lift hard and heavy. Doing 100 reps with a 2kg dumbbell won’t be enough to stimulate the muscle growth you need to improve your body composition.


But in today's unenlightened "believe everything you hear" age this most effective and proven approach, for some strange reason, does not seem to attract much interest. This is no more obvious when one witnesses the "technological" revolution that is happening within the fitness industry, where a newer even more ridiculous gadget compared to the one that preceded it promises to build you the body of your dreams, with little effort on your part, "in 30 days or your money back"; where a machine that does most of the work for you is touted as a suitable replacement for actually applying a modicum of effort. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDHGaU_jGrQ
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