Almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios — at GH, we're nuts about nuts! People who snack on nuts may have lower abdominal fat than those who munch on carb-based treats, according to a 2015 study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats, a heart-healthy (and more satisfying) pick than their grain-based counterparts.
Know what the healthy fats are. Because your body does need them! It's not a good idea to cut them out entirely -- just concentrate on the good ones -- those are the unsaturated kind. They're found in avocados, olive oils, nuts, fatty fish like salmon and trout, an low-fat dairy products. In fact, having these healthy fats in your diet (moderately, of course) can help lower cholesterol levels and reduce risks of heart disease.[7]
Chronic stress may increase levels of stress hormones such as cortisol in your body. This can cause increased hunger and result in weight gain. If you’re looking to lose weight, you should review possible ways to decrease or better handle excessive stress in your life. Although this often demands substantial changes, even altering small things – such as posture – may immediately affect your stress hormone levels, and perhaps your weight.
Amino Loading is a term we use to describe the combination of 100 % MR and Muscle Synthesis which efficiently deliver crucial amino acids in a rapid fashion. Consumed before training this unique combo forces the body to use more stored fat as fuel during exercise while also helping the trainee to shift to a more anabolic (fat burning) hormonal environment. During and after training amino acids provide an alternative energy source to support improved training performance (especially important during a low carb diet) and lay the building blocks needed for new muscle growth. Following training your first priority should be accelerating recovery and Amino Loading provides the critical ratios of amino acids needed to be quickly assimilated into hungry muscles. A protein shake post workout alone does not do the job, during training you pump blood into the muscles to act as a nutrient super highway to carry in raw materials. Drinking a shake following training will draw blood away from the muscles and into the stomach to support digestion which deteriorates much of the raw material value and slows down the delivery of nutrients.
3. Be realistic about which habits need to go. "When I was heavy, I'd eat French fries every single day, plus carbs at almost every meal—like a sandwich for lunch or bread with pasta for dinner. A diet so heavy in fried food and carbs just isn't conducive to weight loss. To lose the weight, I went from three large meals a day to six small meals, mostly made of fresh vegetable salads with lean meats and nuts. And no more bread!"

While eating carbohydrates early in the day provides us with the energy needed to power through training sessions and complete our daily tasks, and the evening meal containing them helps us to replace lost glycogen from our final workout for the day, consuming carbohydrates after 6:00pm (or around this period) will only lead to an unnecessary output of insulin, an anabolic hormone responsible for, among other functions, increasing fat storage.
Still with us? Let’s move onto absorption. The absorption of fats happen in our small intestine, but as mentioned above, triglycerides can’t be absorbed in our intestine unless they are broken down, absorbed into the intestine walls, then transported to our lymphatic system first and eventually into our bloodstream, where they’ll reach adipose, cardiac, and muscle tissue.
Or skip your favorite early-morning show—whatever it takes to grab a few more minutes of sleep each day. When researchers at the University of Chicago studied men who were sleep-deprived, they found that after just a few days, their bodies had a much harder time processing glucose in the blood—a problem common in overweight diabetics. When the individuals returned to a more normal seven to eight hours of sleep a night, however, their metabolisms returned to normal.
Being in optimal ketosis for a prolonged period of time (say, a month) will ensure that you experience the maximal hormonal effect from eating a low-carb diet. If this doesn’t result in noticeable weight loss, you can be certain that too many carbs are NOT part of your weight issue and not the obstacle to your weight loss. There are, in fact, other causes of obesity and being overweight. The next three tips in this series might help you. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0HX4GZqXRA
Not in an extreme, Atkins sort of way, but having a little protein at every meal fires up your metabolism. "Your digestive system uses more energy to break it down, so you burn more calories," explains Lisa Dorfman, R.D. However, keep protein levels to between 20 and 35 percent of your diet; eating too much of it can cause kidney strain and may cause your body to store too much fat.
Dairy products contain varying amounts of lactose (milk sugar), which slows down weight loss. What’s more, part of the protein in milk generates a significant insulin response, which can have the same effect. Consequently, cutting back on dairy products may accelerate weight loss. This applies especially to dairy products typically lacking in fat, such as regular milk and various yogurts, but be careful with full-fat dairy such as cream and cheese all the same. And don’t forget whey protein powder, which is pure milk protein.

However, it’s not just the foods we eat that provide the fuel needed to function normally, our body has room for storage too. Glucose from carbs (stored as glycogen in your liver and muscles) and fatty acids (stored as triglycerides and found all over the body in adipose tissue) are stored as reserves to be used by your body under different conditions.
Further, by building muscle - and thus permanently increasing our metabolic rate - we become walking furnaces, burning fat even while at rest. Given that muscle is a metabolically active tissue, it requires a continual turnover of energy to maintain, a degree of output that steadily targets our fat cells for fuel. The dilemma we face, then, lies in determining just how much cardio and weight training should be done to maximize the fat burning effect. One common theme that has emerged in reviewing the results of the many people I have trained over the years is the profound effect weight training has had on their weight loss success.

It is possible to do more in less time — at least when it comes to your workouts. By incorporating interval training — that means bursts of high-intensity moves — you’ll give your metabolism a huge boost, says Glenn Gaesser, Ph.D., director of the Kinesiology Program at the University of Virginia and author of The Spark. If you usually jog at a consistent pace, try adding a 30-second to one-minute sprint every five minutes, or, if you’re on a treadmill, change up the incline for one-minute intervals.


Keto. Flexitarian. Paleo. Whole 30. Vegan. There are as many diets in existence as there are dangerous weight loss myths. So which eating style should you choose when you’re on a get-fit-quick and have just 10 days? Turns out, numerous studies have found it essentially doesn’t matter which plan you follow for rapid weight loss, be it low-carb or low-fat, as long as you’re eating fewer calories than you’re burning. The key is that it’s sustainable: a strategy that you can keep up for the week and a half—and beyond. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84TWhmsl8Kc
The notion that abdominal obesity is the most dangerous kind isn't new. Back in the 1940s, the French physician Jean Vague observed that some obese patients had normal blood chemistry, while some moderately overweight patients showed serious abnormalities that predisposed them to heart disease or diabetes. Almost always, the latter patients carried their fat around their middles. And, almost always, they were men.
It’s impossible to target belly fat specifically when you diet. But losing weight overall will help shrink your waistline; more importantly, it will help reduce the dangerous layer of visceral fat, a type of fat within the abdominal cavity that you can’t see but that heightens health risks, says Kerry Stewart, Ed.D., director of Clinical and Research Physiology at Johns Hopkins.
"Your body has been starving all night long, and it needs nutrients to rebuild itself," says Matarazzo. "If you just catch something quick on the run instead of eating a full meal, it negatively impacts your workout, and everything else you do during the day." Eat sufficient protein (30-40g), a complex carbohydrate, like oatmeal, and a piece of fruit to start your day off right. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzWc0JTsPhg
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