GM diet is a weight loss management plan developed by the General Motors Corporation to help keep their employees stay in shape. This diet system involves the consumption of specific foods per day, in contrast to weekly schedules like that of Atkins and South Beach diets. What started as an in-house program for individuals within the General Motors Corporation today has become a worldwide phenomenon. The GM diet plan has grown to be a popular diet plan over time has caught on and today has become very popular with people looking for a diet plan that works.
There's a reason you've been hearing so much about cutting meat out of your diet lately. It's not just great for your body, but also a quick way to shed some extra pounds. "Consider swapping a few meat-centric meals each week for ones centered around vegetarian proteins — or give a full-fledged vegetarian diet a try if that's of interest to you," Gorin says. "Research shows eating a vegetarian diet may boost and speed up weight loss, resulting in a loss of up to 10 pounds." Gorin recommends topping a salad or filling a veggie taco with vegetarian protein sources like pulses — which are beans, chickpeas, lentils, and dried peas — to give your weight loss a boost. One study found eating ¾ cup of pulses daily led to a loss of close to a pound over about six weeks, versus people not eating pulses daily.
Carb crazy? Consider this: Refined carbohydrates, such as bread, potatoes and rice, create a surge in insulin that in turn drives down your resting metabolic rate, explains Aronne. "It's important to keep carbohydrates in your diet, but really focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which have less of an effect on insulin levels," he explains. And when buying whole-grain breads and cereals, make sure the first ingredient listed is whole wheat, whole oat or cracked wheat.
Nuts, the second food to watch, contain a fair amount of carbohydrate, and it’s very easy to unwittingly scarf down large quantities. Cashew nuts are among the worst carb-wise – you’ll find that they contain around 20% carbohydrate by weight. For someone following a strict keto diet with a 20 grams of carbs per day allowance, this means that consuming 100 grams (which happens in a flash!) will have filled their daily quota. Peanuts tend to be around 10-15% carbohydrate – not putting them in the clear either.

The popular Atkins Diet, for example, encourages one to load up on fatty foods at the expanse of carbohydrates, the theory being that the body will become programmed to burn fat as opposed to carbohydrates for energy, which will ultimately lead to a leaner physique. However, the lack of nutrients this diet offers, and that would be included when consuming a wide variety of food sources may, over time, lead to nutritional imbalances and poor health. Due to its limited food choices this diet is also boring for many people. Overall it appears that fad diets - so called become they usually fall out of favor quickly or become popular, depending on one's subjective view - are used to reach a specific target (such is the case, for example, with the "three day diet"): perhaps a new dress is to be worn for a special occasion and one only has a few weeks to lose enough weight to fit it.


But in today's unenlightened "believe everything you hear" age this most effective and proven approach, for some strange reason, does not seem to attract much interest. This is no more obvious when one witnesses the "technological" revolution that is happening within the fitness industry, where a newer even more ridiculous gadget compared to the one that preceded it promises to build you the body of your dreams, with little effort on your part, "in 30 days or your money back"; where a machine that does most of the work for you is touted as a suitable replacement for actually applying a modicum of effort. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDHGaU_jGrQ
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