"Protein is great for fat loss. It helps build and preserve lean muscle tissue and can increase the amount of calories you burn. It’s also a great source of energy that helps you feel fuller for longer, so you’re less tempted to snack. Good sources include chicken breast, tuna, eggs, milk and chickpeas. And if you’re finding it difficult to avoid snacks that are high in carbohydrates, try substituting them for protein shakes or bars. Remember also to opt for the lean sources of protein because some sources can be high in saturated fat."

Sustainable weight loss is never achieved with a short-term fix. Crash diets and maniacal training regimes will never last in the long run and will always end badly. While you can really kick-start your weight loss in the first 10 days, keeping losing weight and maintaining your lean and healthy body is about building in lasting habits to your lifestyle.

High-fiber foods are good for your health and weight loss. Fiber-rich foods might help boost weight loss by helping you to feel fuller after you eat. But most of us eat only about half as much fiber as we should. High-fiber foods generally require more chewing time, which gives your body time to register when you’re no longer hungry, so you’re less likely to overeat. And high-fiber diets also tend to be less "energy dense", which means they have fewer calories for the same volume of food. So the best way to add more fiber to your diet is by starting your day with a fiber-packed breakfast in the form of oats, whole wheat flakes & muesli. You can also include fruit with every meal, and start your meal with a bowl of fresh, seasonal salad.


Know what the healthy fats are. Because your body does need them! It's not a good idea to cut them out entirely -- just concentrate on the good ones -- those are the unsaturated kind. They're found in avocados, olive oils, nuts, fatty fish like salmon and trout, an low-fat dairy products. In fact, having these healthy fats in your diet (moderately, of course) can help lower cholesterol levels and reduce risks of heart disease.[7]
Bars have come a long way when it comes to taste, but they are nothing more than high protein candy bars. They are a great tool for gaining weight or every once in a while when you are in a pinch. Otherwise do not use them, be aware that this “net impact carbs” and other labeling tricks are a scam. Companies have replaced sugar with other sweeteners which do not count as carbs on the label. As a result you end up with a bar “low in carbs” but sky high in sweeteners that will cause more havoc with insulin levels than real sugar. I have yet to find a bar high enough in fiber and low in sweeteners to allow people to lose body fat when eaten regularly.
As we mentioned above, the fat we eat is a fuel that our body uses to produce energy (ATP). Fat is actually a great source of fuel as it provides nine calories of energy per gram (carbs and proteins give us four calories of energy per gram). Also, consumption of fat — especially omega 3s — is essential since our body can’t create certain fat molecules that are essential for proper cell function.
Putting your body in starvation mode makes it think it needs to store fat when it gets the chance, so as soon as you start eating again, that's what it does. It changes your metabolism and it's hard to get it back to normal. Not to mention, starving yourself is hazardous to your health. Food is required for things like basic organ function. You can honestly lose more weight more comfortably and keep it off for longer by just eating right. Check out a book called the Fast Metabolism Diet, it explains everything and I have seen it work for many people.
Fats are used by the body — together with glycogen stores — to fuel between meals, while sleeping, or when aren’t quite meeting our caloric needs. An important role of fat is to supply energy to our cells so that they can create ATP. Fat is a highly concentrated energy source but it needs to be broken down to participate in the creation of ATP. This process happens in special energy factories called mitochondria (7). We aren’t going to get into the specifics of the fat-to-ATP-process now but if you’d like some further reading, go here.
Tackling such training first thing in the morning on an empty stomach is also a great idea - despite what some people say - as this, provided training intensity does not extended beyond moderate and session length is kept as prescribed, will directly target body fat, since glycogen stores will typically be low at this time leaving fat as a major fuel source; if we wait until after breakfast then a percentage of the energy burned will come from the carbohydrates consumed earlier, despite the fact that aerobics, in its purest form, uses oxygen - which activates the usage of fat stores - for energy.

But in today's unenlightened "believe everything you hear" age this most effective and proven approach, for some strange reason, does not seem to attract much interest. This is no more obvious when one witnesses the "technological" revolution that is happening within the fitness industry, where a newer even more ridiculous gadget compared to the one that preceded it promises to build you the body of your dreams, with little effort on your part, "in 30 days or your money back"; where a machine that does most of the work for you is touted as a suitable replacement for actually applying a modicum of effort. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDHGaU_jGrQ
×