14 ways to lose weight without diet or exercise Strict diets can be challenging to follow, and people may not always have the time or ability to exercise. However, a variety of simple lifestyle changes can help people lose weight and improve their health. These include taking probiotics, getting enough sleep, and thoroughly chewing food. Learn more here. Read now
Green tea isn't known only for its cancer-fighting benefits: It may help boost your metabolism, too. People who took green-tea extract three times a day saw their metabolic rate increase by about 4 percent, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (Translation: You could burn an extra 60 calories a day, which equals about six pounds a year!) It may be because green tea contains catechins, which increase levels of the metabolism-speeding brain chemical norepinephrine, says Joy Bauer, a New York City nutritionist and author of Cooking with Joy.
When insulin is produced for no apparent purpose - for example, when we eat a large pizza late at night - the glucose (a form of sugar converted from carbohydrates) that prompts its release will be, in large part, transformed into glycogen (another form of sugar stored in the muscles and liver) and tucked away for future use. And this is where the problem lies. Once our body's capacity for glycogen storage has been reached (around 350 grams in most adults) any remaining will be converted into fat. For a well fed bodybuilder - especially one whose diet includes 40 percent of their total daily calories in the form of carbohydrates - this 350 gram limit will probably be maintained into the evening hours.
Physical activity helps burn abdominal fat. “One of the biggest benefits of exercise is that you get a lot of bang for your buck on body composition,” Stewart says. Exercise seems to work off belly fat in particular because it reduces circulating levels of insulin—which would otherwise signal the body to hang on to fat—and causes the liver to use up fatty acids, especially those nearby visceral fat deposits, he says.
To figure out how many calories you burn a day, calculate your resting metabolic rate—the number of calories you burn daily doing routine activities, not including formal exercise—using this formula: RMR = bodyweight (in lbs) x 13. Next, determine how many calories you burn through exercise—a half-hour of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise burns around 350 calories in the average man, and a half-hour of lifting burns around 200. Add your RMR to the calories you burn in the gym, and keep your daily calorie consumption below that total.

With an increasing number of "amazing" new weight loss products and services hitting the marketplace daily it comes as no surprise that many who simply wish to lose their love handles without having to subscribe to the latest, often cripplingly expensive fad give up in sheer frustration, especially when said fads do not deliver on their "ripped abs in five minutes", "10 pounds lost in ten days" and "eat KFC all day and lose all the weight you want" promises. Sometimes, to achieve successful outcomes in any endeavor requires getting back to basics and doing what has worked successfully in the past for countless people.


Talk about a catch-22: Doing something healthy, like eating a low-cal meal, can make you less likely to exercise and more likely to gorge yourself with food later on. This is because of a phenomenon scientists call licensing, which happens when we feel that we've earned the right to be self-indulgent. Most people have a tendency to want to balance things out, says Kathleen Vohs, PhD, an associate professor of marketing at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. So when we do one thing that's good for our health, which often requires exerting plenty of discipline and self-control, we like to follow it up with something that lets us indulge ourselves.

"Your body has been starving all night long, and it needs nutrients to rebuild itself," says Matarazzo. "If you just catch something quick on the run instead of eating a full meal, it negatively impacts your workout, and everything else you do during the day." Eat sufficient protein (30-40g), a complex carbohydrate, like oatmeal, and a piece of fruit to start your day off right.
Losing fat doesn't have to be complicated, but it can be so confusing with so much advice coming at you from all angles. Fitness coach Yiannis Fleming (@mrsportofficial on Instagram), who helps thousands of people on their weight-loss journeys, wants to make things simple. With a degree in sport science and a Stanford diploma in health and nutrition, he recently shared a post explaining four tips to help with fat loss.

Obviously, it’s still possible to lose weight on any diet – just eat fewer calories than you burn, right? The problem with this simplistic advice is that it ignores the elephant in the room: Hunger. Most people don’t like to “just eat less”, i.e. being hungry forever. That’s dieting for masochists. Sooner or later, a normal person will give up and eat, hence the prevalence of “yo-yo dieting”.


Still with us? Let’s move onto absorption. The absorption of fats happen in our small intestine, but as mentioned above, triglycerides can’t be absorbed in our intestine unless they are broken down, absorbed into the intestine walls, then transported to our lymphatic system first and eventually into our bloodstream, where they’ll reach adipose, cardiac, and muscle tissue.


While it is technically correct that cardio activity will use fat to fuel energy output, this process usually only lasts as long as the session itself, and because we gradually adjust to certain levels of intensity the body increasingly resists shedding unwanted weight when routinely using this method: this is why varying one's cardio intensity levels is mandatory if we wish to optimize fat loss. Weight training, however, will work one's body much more intensely than most forms of cardio will, thus stimulating a greater metabolic response, which will ultimately lead to increased fat loss above and beyond that directly attributable to aerobic work.
Consuming too many starchy foods, such as potatoes, rice, pasta, and breads (especially at one sitting), provides your body with more than it needs for energy and glycogen stores; anything left over will be stored as fat. "You don't have to eliminate starchy carbs completely," says IFBB pro Mike Matarazzo. "But you should really cut back on them when trying to shed body fat." Limit total starch servings per day to 3-5, where a serving size is one cup of pasta, rice, or sliced potatoes.
Nix nighttime eating. This one is less about science and more about psychology: humans have a tendency to eat the worst stuff (and/or the most) at night. So if you swear to yourself that you won't eat past 8 PM, those late night taco runs won't be happening. And when those late nights roll around and tu quieres tacos but you opt for that glass of water instead, that's poundage falling off. It's tough socially, but it's worth it.
Go for a swim and up your fluid intake, drink loads of water and green vegetable juices. Every season offers us an abundance of water-rich fruits; in summers you have fruits like melons, in the winter months go for amla-water or warm nimbu-paani. Go for the incredible summer fruits and vegetables that are 96% water. In fact a study showed how 14 men and women increased their metabolic rate by 30% by just increasing their water intake on a daily basis. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haY8Q72hgI8
For even more impressive effects on body composition: aim for exercise forms which elicit a positive hormonal response. This means lifting really heavy things (strength training), or interval training. Such exercise increases levels of the sex hormone testosterone (primarily in men) as well as growth hormone. Not only do greater levels of these hormones increase your muscle mass, but they also decrease your visceral fat (belly fat) in the long term. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpyvL0pb0mo
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