One mistake many dieters make, one that bodybuilders have been avoiding for many years, is to eat a serving a protein before bed. Three or so hours after our final meal of the evening the body again begins to ever so slightly enter a catabolic state where the protein we ate hours back has been used to repair muscle, while the carbohydrates have been stored away for future use. Now we are in a position to eat again, but generally cannot consume carbohydrates as they may lead to fat gains (see tip two). So to offset any potential catabolic effects (the aforementioned degrading of muscle tissue for cell maintenance, which also occurs while we sleep) it is smart practice to consume protein before bed.
Talk about a catch-22: Doing something healthy, like eating a low-cal meal, can make you less likely to exercise and more likely to gorge yourself with food later on. This is because of a phenomenon scientists call licensing, which happens when we feel that we've earned the right to be self-indulgent. Most people have a tendency to want to balance things out, says Kathleen Vohs, PhD, an associate professor of marketing at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. So when we do one thing that's good for our health, which often requires exerting plenty of discipline and self-control, we like to follow it up with something that lets us indulge ourselves.
The goal is to break the cycle of the body using just protein or even carbs for fuel; we want the body to be over loaded with dietary fat for a period of time so the system can efficiently use fat as fuel. When you will return to a lower dietary fat intake, yet the body will still know how to utilize the stored fat on your backside as fuel instead of your hard earned muscle.
Studies show that eating breakfast plays a part in successful weight loss — almost 80 percent of people who successfully keep weight off chow down on this meal, according to a study published in Obesity Research. "Your metabolism slows as you sleep, and the process of digesting food revs it up again," explains Heller. Aim for a 300- to 400-calorie breakfast, such as a high-fiber cereal (another metabolism booster) with skim milk and fruit.
Basically, the effect of exercise on our weight is vastly overrated. That’s why it’s only number 15 on this list. There are other things you need to take care of first. It’s not a good idea to eat bad food, drink sugar water (so-called “sports drinks”) or be on medications which force you to exercise for hours daily just to compensate. Metaphorically that’s like digging a hole, into which you put your ladder, on which you stand and paint the basement-level windows of your house.
Add a cup of low-fat milk, a part-skim mozzarella stick, or a half cup of low-sodium cottage cheese to breakfast, and you may have a belly-busting win. While lots of research links calcium with lower body weights, results from a 2014 study suggest that calcium-containing foods may reduce waist circumference in those genetically predisposed to carrying weight in their midsection.
Women who ate low-fat dairy products, such as non-fat yogurt and low-fat cheese three to four times a day lost 70 percent more fat than low-dairy dieters, according to a study published in the journal Obesity Research. "Calcium serves as a switch that tells your body to burn excess fat faster," explains study author Michael Zemel, M.D., director of the Nutrition Institute at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Sorry, but you won't reap the same benefits from calcium-fortified O.J. Research shows that you get the best results from dairy products themselves, not fortified foods. Aim for 1,200 mg, which includes about three servings of dairy a day.
As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories the body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. "If women gain weight after menopause, it's more likely to be in their bellies," says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic's endocrinology division. In menopause, production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone slows down. Meanwhile, testosterone levels also start to drop, but at a slower rate. This shift in hormones causes women to hold onto weight in their bellies. The good news: you can fight this process. Read on.

2. Plan Ahead. You know that feeling where you are ravenous and will eat just about anything in sight in order to make your stomach stop growling? Make sure you are consuming an adequate amount of protein and vegetables throughout the day by incorporating them in every snack and every meal. This will keep your blood sugar balanced and avoid the urge for your mid afternoon sweet treat. Pack snacks, plan ahead, and focus on giving your body nutrients/energy opposed to the first thing you see in a deli.
Many people think they need carbs at every meal. But unlike protein and fat, which are essential to your survival, your body can function quite happily without them. So your diet plan to help you how to lose weight doesn’t need too many carbs. A great place to start is to cut highly-processed carbs out of your diet and swap them for green vegetables like broccoli, spinach and kale. They are full of vitamins and minerals, high in dietary fibre and low on calories. This means that you can eat lots of them to help keep hunger at bay.
You don’t have to be the next Usain Bolt in the making to enjoy some serious belly-slimming results from hitting the track from time to time. Even a moderate-rate jog a few times a week can blast through that belly fat; in fact, a study conducted at Duke University Medical Center found that, over the course of an eight-month study, overweight adult study subjects who jogged 12 miles a week lost the most belly fat and burned 67 percent more calories than participants who did an equivalent amount of resistance exercise, or a combination of cardio and resistance work. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4Ev17To2XY
You don’t have to go low-carb to ditch those extra pounds around your waist in a short period of time. In fact, opting for more whole grains might just get you there faster. Researchers at Tufts University have linked eating three or more daily servings of whole grains to as much as a 10 percent reduction in visceral body fat, the kind that ups your risk for chronic diseases, like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

Meal prepping takes a few hours a week, but it's worth it: By getting your meals ready ahead of time, you won't be so tempted to order your go-to Chinese takeout when you're tired and hungry after work. "When you plan an entire week of dinner in advance, you're way less likely to go off course and indulge in foods that aren't good for you," says Pamela Salzman, a certified holistic health expert and cooking instructor. And since you planned things out, you'll actually get the protein, fruit, and veggies your body needs — and you'll lose weight in the process.


I do advocate periodic cheat meals, but never for the first meal of the day. Research proves that breakfast is the most important meal of the day when it comes to setting the pace for blood sugar levels. I want my clients to satisfy cravings, but at the same time I want to minimize the damage and prevent body fat accumulation. Take Alpha Omega before and after any cheat meal and you will keep blood sugar levels under control which will minimize body fat accumulation. It is not a fat blocker as that concept is a scam, but the concept is somewhat similar.
When you stay hungry, all the junk you are trying to avoid can get too tempting to resist. To keep yourself from getting too hungry between meals, always keep something with you that you can munch on. It doesn’t always have to be celery or carrot sticks. You can always treat yourself to something delicious that isn’t completely terrible for your diet.
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