Tight deadlines, bills, your kids—whatever your source of stress, having too much of it may make it harder for you to drop unwanted pounds, especially from your middle. And it's not just because you tend to reach for high-fat, high-calorie fare when you're stressed, though that's part of it. It's also due to the stress hormone cortisol, which may increase the amount of fat your body clings to and enlarge your fat cells. Higher levels of cortisol have been linked to more visceral fat.
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"With all the different tips out there, it can be tricky to understand exactly which exercises work the best. HIIT is great for fat burning and will get your heart rate up, but I’d also recommend including strength (resistance) exercises too. Try lifting weights, using resistance bands or using the weight machines at the gym as these will increase your metabolism to help with weight loss, and increase your muscle strength. It’s important to mix-up your whole-body workouts so you don’t get bored."
It is best to achieve one's dietary requirements somewhere in the middle and, once again, bodybuilders have led the way in this regard. To gain muscle and lose fat requires a steady stream of nutrients to feed our cells and fuel our workouts. Bodybuilders - dating back to the 40s and 50s - have noted that when consuming four to five (sometimes up to seven) smaller meals per day they are better able to remain lean and muscular.
21. Keep it simple. "I take a minimalist approach to nutrition: My diet consists of lean protein (chicken breast, egg whites, ground turkey), complex carbs (quinoa, sweet potatoes, oatmeal), healthy fats (coconut oil, almonds, avocados), and leafy green veggies. I eat as clean as I can—locally-grown vegetables, organic when possible, and minimally-processed everything."

2.  Cut out all salt besides what’s naturally in food.  This is somewhat obvious, but a major player in water retention is salt intake.  And generally speaking, most people consume too much salt in their diets, while dropping salt intake down, shoot for 100 oz’s of water per day if you are under 160 and 140 oz’s per day if your over 160.  Dropping the salt and increasing water will cause your body to drastically reduce any extra water it may be holding onto.
In addition to all of the health benefits, water will keep muscles full and prepared for action. Lastly when I say water I mean water, not diet pop or other drinks. I hate to break it to you, but diet soda is not so great. One or so a day is ok, but more than that can get in the way of your goals. Coffee is fine, but use regular milk or real cream instead of sugar and the like. Remember that coffee will dehydrate you to a degree so you must drink ample water to replace what is lost.
Some of us no longer have the strong joints we had as teenagers. Jogging is out of the question and walking doesn’t cut it. The good news is elliptical trainers provide an intense, low impact cardio workout. In fact, a 145-lb. person can burn about 300 calories in 30 minutes on an elliptical trainer. That’s about as many calories as running burns, but without the joint wear-and-tear. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MqB5nq2z2w
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