Further, by building muscle - and thus permanently increasing our metabolic rate - we become walking furnaces, burning fat even while at rest. Given that muscle is a metabolically active tissue, it requires a continual turnover of energy to maintain, a degree of output that steadily targets our fat cells for fuel. The dilemma we face, then, lies in determining just how much cardio and weight training should be done to maximize the fat burning effect. One common theme that has emerged in reviewing the results of the many people I have trained over the years is the profound effect weight training has had on their weight loss success.
Remove cardio and maintain the weight training and fat loss results will still come, provided their nutrition is sound. Furthermore, their physiques will look vastly more impressive compared with those who emphasize aerobic work at the expense of resistance training. By removing weight training and continuing cardio, however, a person will no doubt begin to resemble one of those unhealthy looking marathon runners, the only class of people who appear to have mastered the art of looking lean and fat at the same time.
Wheatgrass has a high concentration of iron, magnesium, calcium, amino acids, vitamins C, A and E, B12, B6 and chlorophyll. These vitamins and minerals provide many therapeutic benefits. Consuming wheatgrass can rid the digestive system of harmful bacteria and cleanse the body of toxins. It also cleanses the colon and can help in the treatment of joint pain, ulcerative colitis, skin infections and can even prevent diabetes. No wonder it is regarded as a superfood!
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I am fasting for Ramadan. Can I do this diet? Yes, but you will have to spread your meals out. Drink cold water at 4 a.m. Wait 15 to 20 minutes and eat a big meal with the foods on that day's menu. Then at 7 p.m. when you can break your fast, drink another glass of cold water and wait 15 to 20 minutes. Eat another meal. Repeat through the evening, eating small meals until bedtime.


Unsaturated fats like poly- and monounsaturated fats can lower cholesterol levels, which reduces the risk of heart disease. Unsaturated fats are typically liquid at room temperature and provide our bodies with essential fats that they can’t create on their own. These fats mainly come from plants (avocado, nuts and seeds, olive, canola, etc.) but some come from the sea too (fish and seafood).
Some of us no longer have the strong joints we had as teenagers. Jogging is out of the question and walking doesn’t cut it. The good news is elliptical trainers provide an intense, low impact cardio workout. In fact, a 145-lb. person can burn about 300 calories in 30 minutes on an elliptical trainer. That’s about as many calories as running burns, but without the joint wear-and-tear.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MqB5nq2z2w
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