1. Nutrition & Hydration – the body is 70% composed of water, and it’s involved in almost every systemic function – ensuring the appropriate level of hydration prior to your workout lifts your training efficiency, and enables your body to make full use of its fuel for your session. Eliminating refined sugars, going low-GI, opting for a diet rich in lean proteins, pursuing healthy fats (think avocados, olive oil, and fish) & eating little-and-often through the day are the best way to regulate sugar levels.

The main advantage of the low-carb diet is that it causes you to want to eat less. Even without counting calories most overweight people eat far fewer calories on low carb. Sugar and starch may increase your hunger, while avoiding them may decrease your appetite to an adequate level. If your body wants to have an appropriate number of calories you don’t need to bother counting them. Thus: Calories count, but you don’t need to count them.


"Your body has been starving all night long, and it needs nutrients to rebuild itself," says Matarazzo. "If you just catch something quick on the run instead of eating a full meal, it negatively impacts your workout, and everything else you do during the day." Eat sufficient protein (30-40g), a complex carbohydrate, like oatmeal, and a piece of fruit to start your day off right. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhVzVfA-8Kc
3. Last tip is mindfulness and discipline. Most people eat out of boredom or anxiety. If you find yourself bored, play your favorite music and start dancing, if you are at work, try going for a short walk during your break. Also, stay active; remember that exercise is important to maintaining a healthy weight. Think of you calories as banking… You don’t spend the money you don’t have so you don’t bounce your account, same analogy goes for food. Don’t eat calories you won’t burn through the day. Eat as many calories as your body burns to maintain weight, and eat lower amount for weight loss (consult a professional if you need guidance).
Do you even lift, bro? If you’re serious about getting rid of that belly fat fast, resistance training might just be the key. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that adding weight training to adult male test subjects’ workouts significantly reduced their risk of abdominal obesity over a multi-year study period, although doing the same amount of cardio had no such effect. Research from the University of Maryland even found that just 16 weeks of weight training boosted study participants’ metabolic rates by a whopping 7.7 percent, making it easier to ditch those extra inches around your middle.
‘Do it for a couple of minutes in bed and you’ll actually be able to wind down and fall asleep more easily. But it’s a skill, so it requires a commitment to practice it, as with anything. Think of it a bit like dating – the first time you do it it’s terrible, it’s uncomfortable, nobody knows what they’re doing, but the more dates you go on the better it gets.
But in today's unenlightened "believe everything you hear" age this most effective and proven approach, for some strange reason, does not seem to attract much interest. This is no more obvious when one witnesses the "technological" revolution that is happening within the fitness industry, where a newer even more ridiculous gadget compared to the one that preceded it promises to build you the body of your dreams, with little effort on your part, "in 30 days or your money back"; where a machine that does most of the work for you is touted as a suitable replacement for actually applying a modicum of effort. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDHGaU_jGrQ
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