While some athletes eschew cardio, that doesn't mean they don't integrate metabolic "finishers" into their resistance workouts. "What's worked for me in the last few years for fat loss has been adding in short, 5-10 minute finishers after my strength-training workouts 1-3 times per week," says Cappotelli. "A few examples are several sets of heavy farmer's walks, battling ropes, double-unders (jump rope), kettlebell swings, and prowler sprints, or a combination of those."

A plateful of healthful diet can bring about a lot of difference in your 10 day weight loss program. Along with the vegetables, you may have low fat yoghurt, one egg, beans, and 2 plates each of 250gms of pasta along with tomato sauce and fruit juice. A cup serving of fibre-rich foods, such as barley, raspberries, pears and whole wheat pasta can help cut hunger between meals. Fibre makes one feel full quickly, helping one lose weight fast.
You don’t have to be the next Usain Bolt in the making to enjoy some serious belly-slimming results from hitting the track from time to time. Even a moderate-rate jog a few times a week can blast through that belly fat; in fact, a study conducted at Duke University Medical Center found that, over the course of an eight-month study, overweight adult study subjects who jogged 12 miles a week lost the most belly fat and burned 67 percent more calories than participants who did an equivalent amount of resistance exercise, or a combination of cardio and resistance work.
When Tufts University researchers studied the waistlines and diets of 459 people, they found that even in men of similar age and activity level, those who ate white bread frequently weighed more than those who didn’t. “The calories from white bread and refined grains just seem to settle at the waistline more than calories from other foods,” says Katherine Tucker, Ph.D., the study author.
To banish stubborn belly fat, you have to ramp up your workouts. In a study published in the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, people who completed a high-intensity workout regimen lost more belly fat than those who followed a low-intensity plan. (In fact, the low-intensity exercises experienced no significant changes at all.) "You need to exercise at full intensity because the end goal is to burn more calories, and high intensity exercise does just that," says Natalie Jill, a San Diego, Calif.-based certified personal trainer. High intensity workouts mean you're going all out for as long as you can. If this sounds intimidating, think of it this way: you'll burn more calories in less time.
A 2012 study also showed that people on a low-carb diet burned 300 more calories a day – while resting! According to one of the Harvard professors behind the study this advantage “would equal the number of calories typically burned in an hour of moderate-intensity physical activity”. Imagine that: an entire bonus hour of exercise every day, without actually exercising. A later, even larger and more carefully conducted study confirmed the effect, with different groups of people on low-carb diets burning an average of between 200 and almost 500 extra calories per day.
"Only doing abdominal-focused workouts, like crunches, won’t help you banish the bulge. Belly fat is simply where your body stores energy, so you need to take a whole-body approach to tackle it. HIIT training (high intensity interval training) is a great way to burn fat and get your heart rate up. Squats, burpees and treadmill sprints are all examples to try." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXyOlGTT9QE
×