The sad truth is that conventional ideas – eat less, run more – do not work long term. Counting calories, exercising for hours every day and trying to ignore your hunger? That’s needless suffering and it wastes your time and precious willpower. It’s weight loss for masochists. Eventually almost everyone gives up. That’s why we have an obesity epidemic. Fortunately there’s a better way. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRCCOfopi5w
"Your body has been starving all night long, and it needs nutrients to rebuild itself," says Matarazzo. "If you just catch something quick on the run instead of eating a full meal, it negatively impacts your workout, and everything else you do during the day." Eat sufficient protein (30-40g), a complex carbohydrate, like oatmeal, and a piece of fruit to start your day off right. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhVzVfA-8Kc
But there are some basic things to be followed, first of all you must have to control your diet, it is better to know what not to eat rather than what to eat. Stop eating sweets(suger), oily/fatty foods, junk foods, on the whole, any food, which contains more fat and carbohydrate, you will have to say good bye those, and most important never eat more than how much you need.
A lack of sleep makes your hormones turn in the wrong direction. Countless studies show that a few nights of poor sleep can negatively alter your insulin sensitivity. In our experience those with inadequate sleep consume more sugar for a variety of reasons. A good nights rest is a key to successful days fueling optimal physical and mental energy to accomplish the tasks at hand. Optimizing your natural anabolic hormone levels is an important part of the recovery process as it relates to weight training especially. Lack of sleep is a common cause of overtraining. While some people have trouble going to sleep many more experience difficulty staying in a deep level of sleep. Waking up feeling tired is a sign that the quality of sleep is poor. High stress levels are a common reason behind some sleep difficulties; try the Fat Reduce PM which was engineered to lower stress levels before sleep. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5zQT2qpfYI
Not in an extreme, Atkins sort of way, but having a little protein at every meal fires up your metabolism. "Your digestive system uses more energy to break it down, so you burn more calories," explains Lisa Dorfman, R.D. However, keep protein levels to between 20 and 35 percent of your diet; eating too much of it can cause kidney strain and may cause your body to store too much fat.
If you’re logging just a few hours of sleep a night, you may actually find yourself gaining weight. Researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center found that subjects who slept just four hours had a harder time processing carbs. "When you're exhausted, your body lacks the energy to do its normal day-to-day functions, which includes burning calories efficiently," says Talbott.

It has to do with your hormones leptin and ghrelin.[4] Your levels get all sort of messed up and it leads to them telling your body you're hungry when you're really just tired. And to top it off, when you're sleepy, you load up on sugar, grab take out for dinner because you're tired, and skip the gym for the same reason. That's three strikes right there.


Suspect you have a sluggish metabolism? You might have hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid gland, which afflicts about 25 percent of American women — many of whom don't know they have the condition, according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. "The thyroid gland controls your body's metabolism, so one of the first signs that it may be off is an inability to lose weight," explains Pamela Peeke, M.D., professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After Forty. Your doctor can determine if you're suffering from hypothyroidism by running a blood test. If you do have an underactive thyroid, you'll be treated with a synthetic thyroid supplement, which you will need to take for the rest of your life (it will return your metabolism to normal, so it should be easier to drop unwanted pounds).

As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories the body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. "If women gain weight after menopause, it's more likely to be in their bellies," says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic's endocrinology division. In menopause, production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone slows down. Meanwhile, testosterone levels also start to drop, but at a slower rate. This shift in hormones causes women to hold onto weight in their bellies. The good news: you can fight this process. Read on.
The sad truth is that conventional ideas – eat less, run more – do not work long term. Counting calories, exercising for hours every day and trying to ignore your hunger? That’s needless suffering and it wastes your time and precious willpower. It’s weight loss for masochists. Eventually almost everyone gives up. That’s why we have an obesity epidemic. Fortunately there’s a better way. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IB1AUnLuLs
Do not try to lose weight too rapidly. Crash diets and diet pills that promise weight loss are usually bad for you and actually don't help keep the weight off in the long run. Resist the urge to take the "easy" way out and instead stick with a healthier lifestyle. This way you lose the weight and improve your health, helping you keep the weight off in a way that won't harm you in the long run.
"Your body has been starving all night long, and it needs nutrients to rebuild itself," says Matarazzo. "If you just catch something quick on the run instead of eating a full meal, it negatively impacts your workout, and everything else you do during the day." Eat sufficient protein (30-40g), a complex carbohydrate, like oatmeal, and a piece of fruit to start your day off right. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhVzVfA-8Kc

Carb crazy? Consider this: Refined carbohydrates, such as bread, potatoes and rice, create a surge in insulin that in turn drives down your resting metabolic rate, explains Aronne. "It's important to keep carbohydrates in your diet, but really focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which have less of an effect on insulin levels," he explains. And when buying whole-grain breads and cereals, make sure the first ingredient listed is whole wheat, whole oat or cracked wheat.
Almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios — at GH, we're nuts about nuts! People who snack on nuts may have lower abdominal fat than those who munch on carb-based treats, according to a 2015 study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats, a heart-healthy (and more satisfying) pick than their grain-based counterparts.
To figure out how many calories you burn a day, calculate your resting metabolic rate—the number of calories you burn daily doing routine activities, not including formal exercise—using this formula: RMR = bodyweight (in lbs) x 13. Next, determine how many calories you burn through exercise—a half-hour of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise burns around 350 calories in the average man, and a half-hour of lifting burns around 200. Add your RMR to the calories you burn in the gym, and keep your daily calorie consumption below that total.

You don’t have to go low-carb to ditch those extra pounds around your waist in a short period of time. In fact, opting for more whole grains might just get you there faster. Researchers at Tufts University have linked eating three or more daily servings of whole grains to as much as a 10 percent reduction in visceral body fat, the kind that ups your risk for chronic diseases, like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.
Yes, you read it right: The vast majority of the fat we eat — or that comes from our storage rooms (adipose tissue) — is converted into CO2 and lost in the air! The leftover weight is lost in the form of water via sweat, tears, urine, etc. In fact, almost everything we eat exits the body via CO2 and water — it’s only fiber that remains undigested and makes its way out your backend.
High-intensity interval training (or HIIT) boosts your metabolism, burns calories, and builds muscle: a triple threat belly fat cannot reckon with. “High-intensity interval training is when you perform an exercise at or close to your maximum ability for a short period of time and then take a brief respite and do it again. HIIT should usually be done on a 2:1 interval, meaning if you did an exercise for one minute, you rest for 30 seconds and then repeat,” explains Dr. Alex Tauberg, DC, CSCS, EMR. “This can be a great way to flatten that stomach when you don’t have too much time to work out.”
“If there’s one thing that comes up over and over with the thousands of patients enrolled in the National Weight Control Registry, it’s weighing yourself every day on a scale,” says Rena Wing, Ph.D., founder of the registry, which tracks more than 4,500 men and women who have lost an average of 20lbs or more and kept it off for at least six years. “Don’t obsess over the number,” she says, “but at least keep track of the general range of what you weigh so you can catch small changes as they occur and take corrective measures immediately.”
Switch it up. It's too easy to develop a routine...and then get bored with it. Either your muscles get bored or your mind gets bored or both. And when this happens, you actually burn fewer calories -- you're pushing yourself less hard. So switch it up! Either mess around with duration or intensity or do a completely new activity. Your body and mind will thank you for it.
I know easier said than done, but it is a key factor of the fat loss equation. Stress will ruin your insulin sensitivity causing the body to over secrete the fat storage hormone insulin. Furthermore high cortisol levels elevated due to stress also activate fat storage receptors, for men in the mid section and women have a harder time with the hips/buttocks area. We are well equipped to deal with short term stress such as being chased by a wild animal, but the long term stressors from over due bills, relationship issues, sick relatives etc are what really take a toll. Signs that you are overstressed include excessive body fat levels, consistent fatigue, irritability and lack of motivation. Overtraining syndrome has similar symptoms as high stress levels are one of the key factors involved with reducing your capacity to recover from training.
However, due to the intense exercise, the total calorie consumption is higher. We burn more calories due to the hard muscle work – even AFTER the run. The body needs more energy for recovery, thereby burning even more calories. That’s how you benefit from post-workout fat burning and the afterburn effect (EPOC, excess post-exercise oxygen consumption). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CN-1CUm3J8
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